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Course Outline for Elementary Algebra

1. COURSE CONTENT AND OBJECTIVES:

COURSE CONTENT AND SCOPE –Lecture:
If applicable, outline the topics included in the lecture
portion of the course (Outline reflects course
description, all topics covered in class).
Hours
per topic
COURSE OBJECTIVES - Lecture (If applicable):
upon successful completion of this course, the
student will be able to… (Use action verbs – see
Bloom’s Taxonomy below for “action verbs requiring
cognitive outcomes.”)
1. Real numbers

a. Signed numbers
b. Order of operations
c. Absolute value

5 Upon successful completion of this
course, the student will be able to:

1. Calculate with signed numbers,
order of operations and absolute
value
2. Perform operations with algebraic
expressions
3. Model problems and solve linear
equations and inequalities in one
variable
4. Write ratios and solve proportions
5. Solve formulas for one variable
6. Factor polynomials
7. Add and multiply polynomials
8. Simplify expressions involving
exponents
9. Convert between standard and
scientific notation
10. Perform operations with algebraic
fractions
11. Solve equations involving
algebraic fractions
12. Model and solve quadratic
equations in one variable
13. Apply the Pythagorean theorem to
solve problems
14. Graph simple parabolas
15. Model and solve a 2x2 system of
linear equations
16. Graph linear equations and
inequalities in two variables
17. Read and interpret information
from graphs
18. Calculate and interpret slope
19. Perform operations with radicals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Algebraic expressions

a. Simplifying expressions
b. Evaluating by substitution

5
3. Equations and inequalities

a. Solving linear equations and
inequalities
b. Modeling with equations

10
4. Polynomials and exponents

a. Laws of exponents
b. Negative exponents
c. Scientific notation
d. Addition and multiplication of
polynomials

10
5. Rational expressions

a. Operations with rational
expressions
b. Equations involving rational
expressions
c. Ratio and proportion

10
6. Linear equations in two variables

a. Slope
b. Slope-intercept and point-slope
forms
c. Graphing, reading graphs

10
7. Systems of equations

a. Solution by graphing
b. Substitution method
c. Elimination method
d. Word problems

10
8. Factoring techniques

a. Common factors
b. Difference of squares
c. Quadratic trinomials

10
9. Quadratic equations

a. Solving quadratic equations by
factoring and by the quadratic
formula
b. Graphing simple parabolas
c. Pythagorean theorem

10
10. Roots and radicals

a. Simplifying radical expressions
b. Extraction of roots

This course may also include:
1. Complex fractions
2. Factoring by grouping
3. Completing the square

10
Total lecture hours* 90  

*Total lecture and laboratory hours (which includes the final examination) must equal totals on page 1.

2. REQUIRED TEXTS:

Provide a representative list of textbooks and other required reading; include author, title and date of publication:

Introductory Algebra Equations and Graphs, Katherine & Bruce Yoshiwara;
Beginning Algebra, Lial/Hornsby;
Beginning Algebra, Elayn Martin-Gay

3. SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS:

Reading assignments may include, but are not limited to the following:

4. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:

Title 5, section 55002 requires grades to be “based on demonstrated proficiency in subject matter and the ability to
demonstrate that proficiency, at least in part, by means of essays or, in courses where the curriculum committee deems
them to be appropriate, by problem solving exercises or skills demonstrations by students.” Writing assignments in this
course may include, but are not limited to the following:

Writing assignments in this course include, but are not limited to, problem solving
exercises.

5. REPRESENTATIVE OUTSIDE ASSIGNMENTS:

Out of class assignments may include, but are not limited to the following:

6. REPRESENTATIVE ASSIGNMENTS THAT DEMONSTRATE CRITICAL THINKING:

Title 5, section 55002(a) requires that a degree applicable course have a level of rigor that includes “critical thinking and the
understanding and application of concepts determined by the curriculum committee to be at college level”. Critical thinking
may include, but is not limited to analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Provide examples of assignments that demonstrate
critical thinking.

Writing assignments involve problem solving and analysis. For example: "Two hikers
are 11 miles apart and walking toward each other. They meet in 2 hours. Find the
rate of each hiker if one hiker walks 1.1 mph faster than the other."
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