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Grade 8 Math

Idaho Department of Education
Content Standards
Objective Sub Objectives Task Analysis Essential Vocabulary Sample Assessment
Standard 2: Concepts and Principles of Measurement
Goal 2.1: Understand and use U.S.
customary and metric measurements.
8.M.2.1.1 Select and use appropriate units and tools to
make formal measurements in both systems.

CL: C
Calc: YES
Content Limit: Select appropriate units and tools only.
Units for length are inches, feet, yards, miles,
millimeters, centimeters, and meters. Units for time are
seconds, minutes, hours, days, and years. Units for
weight are ounces, pounds, tons, grams, and kilograms.
Units for volume (capacity) are cups, quarts, gallons,
milliliters, and liters.
‘use … tools to make formal measurements’ to be
assessed in the classroom, not on the ISAT.

• Select and use appropriate units and tools to make
formal measurements in both systems
• determine appropriate customary and metric units for
given objects
• use appropriate tools for measurement in customary
and metric system
• capacity • volume • liter • meter • gram • milli- • centi-
• kilo-
• Measure the length of your pencil to the nearest
centimeter.
• What unit of measure would you use to find the
capacity of a cereal box?
 
  8.M.2.1.2 Apply estimation of measurement to real-world
and content problems using standard measuring
devices.

CL:
Calc:
Content Limit: Assessed in the classroom, not on the
ISAT.

• Apply estimation of measurement to real-world and
content problems using standard measuring devices
• select an appropriate unit of measure for the problem
• demonstrate magnitude of measurements
• magnitude • About how many meters long is a classroom?
• Which is more- a kilometer or a mile?
  8.M.2.1.3 Compare the differences and relationships
among measures of perimeter, area, and volume
(capacity) within both systems.

CL:
Calc:
Content Limit: Assessed in the classroom, not on the
ISAT

• Compare the differences and relationships among
measures of perimeter, area, and volume (capacity)
within both systems
• identify linear units for perimeter, square units for
area, and cubic units for volume
• perimeter • area • volume • capacity • square units •
cubic units • dimensions
• Compare the perimeter and area of a square with 3½"
sides. What is the volume of a cube with the same
dimensions?
  8.M.2.1.4 Given the formulas, find the circumference,
perimeter, or area of triangles, circles, and
quadrilaterals, and the volume and surface area of
rectangular prisms.

CL: C
Calc: YES
Content Limit: Items assess finding linear measure,
capacity, perimeter, circumference, area, surface area,
and/or volume. Items may include composite figures.
Graphics are used in most of these items. Items
requiring three-dimensional graphics must be realistic
and include verbal descriptions. Items should be set in a
real-world context. Answer options may be left in terms
of π.

Calculate the circumference and area of circles given
formulas
• Calculate perimeter and area of triangles and
quadrilaterals given formulas
• Calculate the volume and surface area of rectangular
prisms given formulas
• select and apply formulas to determine circumference
or area of circles given either diameter or radius
• produce answers in terms of pi and using
approximations of pi
• select and apply formulas for area and perimeter of
triangles and quadrilaterals
combine formulas to solve composite area problems
• select and apply formulas for surface area and volume
of rectangular prisms
• radius • diameter • circumference • in terms of pi •
quadrilateral • base • height (altitude) • rhombus •
trapezoid • parallelogram • prism • lateral area • surface
area
• Use the formula C=πd or C=2πr to find the
circumference of a circle with a radius of 3.2 cm.
Leave your answer in terms of pi.
• Use the formula A=½bh to find the area of a triangle
with a height of 7 inches and a base of 12 inches.
• Use the formula V=lwh to find the volume of a
rectangular prism that is 2 cm x 3 cm x 5cm.
  8.M.2.1.5 Convert units of measurement within each
system in problem solving situations .

CL: C
Calc: YES
Content Limit: All conversions must be within the same
system of measurement. Customary units may include
inches, feet, yards, miles, ounces, pounds, tons, fluid
ounces, cups, pints, quarts, and gallons. Metric prefixes
may include milli-, centi-, and kilo- with base units of
grams, liters, and meters. Time units may include years,
months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds.
Items should be set in a real-world context.

• Convert units of measurement within each system in
problem solving situations
• examine units of measure to determine agreement
• determine appropriate unit to use
• convert measurments
• see 8.M.2.1.1 • Sal has a garden that is 5 yards by 8½ feet. He wants
to put a fence around it. How many feet of fence does
he need to buy?
  8.M.2.1.6 Solve problems involving area of circles and
the perimeter and area of rectangles and triangles.

CL: C
Calc: YES
Content Limit: Graphics should be used in most of
these items, as appropriate. Items should be set in a real-world
context. Measurements may be in either metric or
customary units. Problems may include shapes that are
formed by a combination of two shapes .

• Solve problems involving area of circles and the
perimeter and area of rectangles and triangles.
• apply concepts of area and perimeter to solve real
world problems
  • Kendall needs to paint this basketball key which is
made up of a rectangle and a semicircle. The length of
the rectangle is 18 feet and the width is 12 feet. What
is the area of the space that needs to be painted

  8.M.2.1.7 Use appropriate vocabulary and notations.

CL:
Calc:
Content Limit: Assessed in the classroom, not on the
ISAT.
• Use appropriate vocabulary and notations • determine appropriate labeling of perimeter, area and volume
• communicate using correct mathematical terminology
   
Goal 2.2: Apply the concepts of rates,
ratios, and proportions.
8.M.2.2.1 Use rates, proportions, ratios, and map scales
in problem-solving situations.

CL: C
Calc: YES
Content Limit: Items involving rate should not be
limited to time/distance problems, but should include
other rated measures (e.g., rates of change for
temperature
as it changes throughout the day or speed
as the rate of change in distance over time, and other
derived measures). Items may require students to
demonstrate knowledge of proportional relationships in
scale drawings or solve real-world problems, including
distance, using a scale drawing. There should be no
more than two conversions within one dimension per
item (e.g., years to seconds is considered four
conversions: year-day-hour-minute-second).
Measurements may be in either metric or customary
units. Items should involve interpreting and applying
various scales including those based on number lines ,
graphs, models, and maps. Scales should use only
rational numbers . Items should be set in a real-world
context. Graphics are used in most of these items.

• Use rates, proportions, ratios, and map scales in
problem-solving situations.
• relate data as rates, ratios, and proportions
• use proportions to solve problems involving scale
• convert units of measurement as necessary
• proportion • ratio • scale drawing • unit rate • During a 7.5 hour drive, a car's odometer (milage
indicator) starts at 18,560 miles and ends at 18,980
miles. What is the car's rate of travel?
 
  8.M.2.2.2 Determine unit rates in real-world situations.

CL: C
Calc: YES
Content Limit: Situations must be real-world
applications such as gas mileage, speed, growth, etc.
Rates given in the problem should be equivalent unit
rates equal to a whole number or a terminating decimal .

• Determine unit rates in real-world situations • write and use unit rates to solve problems • unit rate • A 32 ounce container of yogurt costs $2.69. An 8
ounce container of yogurt cost $0.75. Find the unit
costs of each container. Which is the better buy?
Goal 2.3: Apply dimensional analysis. 8.M.2.3.1 Illustrate the interrelationship of
measurement units through dimensional analysis
conversions.

CL: C, D
Calc: YES
Content Limit: Customary units may include inches,
feet, yards, miles, ounces, pounds, tons, fluid ounces,
cups, pints, quarts, and gallons. Metric prefixes may
include milli-, centi-, and kilo- with base units of grams,
liters, and meters. Time units may include years,
months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, and seconds. No
more than two conversion ratios should be used in any
item

• Demonstrate the relationship between measurement
units through dimensional analysis conversions
• identify common unit conversions
• use appropriate conversion ratios to relate equivalent
measurement units
• conversion ratio (factor) • Use dimensional analysis to convert 9 kilometers to
meters.
• Use the correct conversion factor to convert 70 ounces
to pounds.
 
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